Instagram Influencer and Model Katya Karlova on Body Dysmorphia and Learning to Love Yourself

By Sophia-Joelle Oswald

According to Mayo Clinic, body dysmorphic disorder is a mental health condition that causes the person affected to carry endless thoughts about what they believe to be flaws in their appearance. These “flaws” tend to be small or non-existent to others, but in their own minds they are constantly feeling defeated, embarrassed, anxious, or even unlovable for those same things.  

Body dysmorphia is different from person to person, but it tends to suck up so much life out of those affected. Some people avoid social events and spend hours in front of the mirror focusing on what they don’t like about themselves. Others may spend tons of money on products designed to cover these perceived flaws, sometimes even seeking surgery. 

Body dysmorphia doesn’t discriminate based on gender, race, age, or other factors. Sadly enough, it has been found in children as young as 5 and in adults as old as 80. Studies find that BDD impacts between 7% and 2.3% of the general population. 

Continue reading

Why you need to follow fat influencers

By Nicole Mitchell

As a Gen Z individual, I’ve spent most of my life on the internet. (I had my first Facebook account when I was only 10). That being said, I’ve followed a ton of people throughout my online life—finding out what I liked and disliked as my tastes changed as I grew up. And, sadly, it wasn’t until recently that I finally realized that something was missing. I wasn’t following any fat influencers.

I had been skinny my whole life. I knew what looked good on me and what didn’t. It wasn’t until I gained weight that I realized that my entire Instagram feed looked the same—they all looked like me, 60 pounds ago. I would look at the women I followed for fashion inspiration but felt like nothing I tried looked the same on me. I was bigger than them. Whether I like to admit it or not, it affected me.

Continue reading

A Pinch

By Kelcie McKenney

A pinch.

Her thumb and forefinger held fast the softness at her middle. She stood—knobby kneed in her stretched out underwear, the fabric thin from nights of tossing and turning, her t-shirt pulled up just under her breast.

A pinch, creating a spread of warmth and reddness, seeping through the skin of her belly.

And she sighed—longingly looking into the mirror at a body that didn’t feel like her own.

Continue reading

The battle of my Christian faith and my newly found sexuality

By Emily Park
Illustrations by Katelyn Betz

Content Warning: Emotional abuse from religious sexism. Bible study text depicting shame included.

Thirteen-year-old me would be absolutely ashamed and horrified, I instantly thought while holding my broken phone case in my hands. Confusing, I know, so let me rewind a little bit.

As I sleepily rolled over to turn off my morning alarm a few Mondays ago, I picked up my phone and realized something was … off. Upon closer inspection, I saw the back of my phone case had completely fallen off leaving just the perimeter of the case on my phone.

The culprit? Last night’s sexual encounter. As my boyfriend and I were passionately grinding against one another, we realized about halfway through that my phone was underneath us.

A normal person probably would have laughed it off, thinking something along the lines of, “Well, if my favorite phone case has to go, that’s definitely the way to do it.” But not me.

Continue reading

Is shapewear anti-feminist? Can feminists afford to be exclusionary on beauty products?

By Hannah Strader

Venus Libido is one of my absolute favorite Instagram accounts. It’s sex-positive, detailed cartoons of women in everyday, not-so-pretty situations convey the reality of how difficult it can be for women to exist in this “picture-perfect” world.

But one of the account’s recent posts divided women in a way I have never seen before by posing the question, “Is shapewear anti-feminist?”

Continue reading