Who runs the world? All the womxn & LGBTQ+ running the U.S. after election day

By Kelcie McKenney, Emily Park, and Jen Harris

After Tuesday’s election, the U.S. not only ended up with the first woman—and a half Black, half Indian woman at that—to hold the title of Vice President of the United States, but also with a record-breaking 134 womxn winning seats in the United States Congress.

New Mexico became the first state to elect all women of color to represent the state in the U.S. House of Representatives. Delaware voted in the first transgender member of the U.S. Senate. Republicans elected their first Native American woman to Congress, who will represent New Mexico. And those are just some of the wins for womxn on election day. 

These are the womxn behind historic firsts of Nov. 3’s election:

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Women in Leadership Today and Societal Roadblocks – Part 5

By Jordan Winberg

The following article is part of a multi-part series of excerpts from the author’s senior thesis. Begin with Part 1. 

 

The Impact of Stereotypes

To get a more in depth look at how stereotypes may be effecting women in leadership, it is important to consider the work of Professor Madeline Heilman, Phd. Professor Heilman is a psychologist who has devoted her entire life’s work to investigating how stereotypes can adversely affect how women are evaluated in the workplace. Her first breakthrough was already discussed in the first paragraph of the paper: the lack of fit model.

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Women in Leadership Today and Societal Roadblocks – Part 4

By Jordan Winberg

The following article is part of a multi-part series of excerpts from the author’s senior thesis. Begin with Part 1. 

 

Do Women Lead Worse?

It is now well established that it is possible for social expectations to be harmful to females in leadership in theory. In practice, do women actually lead significantly worse than men? Alice Eagly, PhD, has made significant leaps in the development of the answer to this question.

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