‘A Feminist’s Guide to: Unlearning White Feminism’ is Babe Collective’s way of telling white feminists it’s time to unlearn that racist bullshit

By Kelcie McKenney

When you opened social media this week chances are you were flooded with black squares. All of your friends came together and supported Black people by sharing a single post on their Instagram! We collectively ended police brutality and racism with a single post! Peak activism! 

Wrong. 

Being an ally doesn’t work like that. And there are a lot of Black, female voices (like these you should follow to start!) telling us—and by us I mean white women—that we’re SO in the wrong. It’s about damn time we listen.

The feminist movement is historically pretty fucking racist, and we’ve got a lot of unlearning to do. A lot, a lot, a lot of unlearning to do. So Aubrey Young and Jihan Bazile of Babe Collective created a zine for white women to use as a jumping off point to “understand our role in White Feminism and to challenge our behaviors and step out of our comfort zone.” 

We spoke with Young, founder of Babe Collective, about the new zine and the launch party and intersectional-focused conversation happening on Friday—which we will be at! (Catcall founder, Kelcie, me!, is on that panel.) It’s a free, virtual workshop, which you can register for here.

There are a lot of resources created by Black women to use after this conversation—which Babe Collective shares in their zine and on social media—so think of this conversation as step one in a lifetime of reeducation, work, and support for the Black community. But we all have to start somewhere.

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The Economics Of Appropriating Black Culture

By Esther Faciane
Originally Published on the I Am Woman Project

Photo by Joanna Nix

Pop culture is no stranger to the words “cultural appropriation”. Over the past few years, celebrities, fashion brands, and artists have been rightfully called out for their appropriating offenses. For example, when a non-Black person wears a du rag or wears cornrows for fashion purposes, it is seen as ignorant appropriation: if that person were really aware of the history behind cornrows, they would not have considered them fashion in the first place.

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