A Sexy Gift Guide from The Babes

By Katie Harbinson and Maddie Womack

As much as we hate the consumerism around the holidays, you know we love treating ourselves to a new toy or two.  Here’s our official gift guide for anyone on the naughty or nice list:

Coming in Clutch

Unbound Babes

For the person who loves a minimal and sleek toy that really packs a punch, Unbound Babes recently launched a new and beautiful rabbit-esque toy called the Clutch. While we love anything Unbound Babes makes, the Clutch is particularly stunning. It vibrates AND thrusts. (Can confirm more than one of our staff members swear by this vibe.)

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My birthing story: I was one of the first non-binary births at Truman Medical

By: Max Sheffield-Baird

I never expected to become pregnant. I had made my peace with it years ago. I was assured by an OBGYN over five years ago that I could not ovulate without medical assistance. As I came to terms with my gender identity as a non-binary trans person, I saw my lack of menstruation as my body doing me a favor and saving me the dysphoria of a monthly reminder of my body not quite fitting the person I knew myself to be.

I’m a nurse. I’ve actually attended two births. Each time I cried. It was a sacred experience to witness. Whether you’re religious or not, I was able to see the argument for a Deity when I’d see a baby take their first breath and their parents get to hold them for the first time. For my own birth experience, I had nervous anticipation. No one comes into Birth prepared. Not really. I had a birth plan but I also knew that nothing goes 100 percent as planned. It was an exercise in letting go and surrendering to the process. I’ve never been very good at that.

I did expect to educate the labor nurses and obstetricians around me on my gender identity and how best to support and affirm me as I went through one of the most vulnerable times of my life. I created a sign and hung it over my hospital bed at Truman Medical: “My name is Max, I’m non-binary, I use they/them pronouns.” The nurses asked questions and were respectful. They asked me if “mom” was still appropriate to use.

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